Catholic Charities ISAAC (Immigrant Support And Assistance Center) program helps reunite families!

We are committed to helping refugees, asylees, and immigrants to address their needs by providing education, connecting them to their new community, and the helping them to succeed in their new country.

We strive to welcome the newcomer and help foreign-born individuals facing obstacles to family unity and/or diminished personal, social, and economic opportunities as a result of their immigration status. Once a person steps into the United States and connects with Catholic Charities, we provide a road map for them—from the initial embrace of the newcomer to naturalization.

Our ISAAC program provides a wide range of services that also includes educating newcomers on U.S. Immigration Laws and visa information, assistance with naturalization, assisting in the initial permanent residency process and renewal, and employment authorization opportunities and employee rights, helping newcomers find programs in the community to learn English as a second language (ESL) and citizenship classes.

Our ISAAC program is recognized by the Department of Justice Office of Legal Access Programs and has helped reunite families and aided those looking to become contributing members of their community regardless of their legal status.

Having access to all these services in one place—a place where newcomers can find people who speak their language and welcome them with open arms—helps ease their burden and enables them to contribute and thrive in their new communities.

Catholic Charities believes there should be greater recognition and more compassion for those coming to the United States seeking asylum. Right now, the basis for asylum doesn't catch the reality of what is going on, or the true reason and real level of unsafety that people have experienced. The reality is that most of the people are trying to escape the gangs and violence that overtook the local towns and communities in their home country.

At Catholic Charities, we deeply care about the well-being and integration of children that were brought to the United States as a child. Loving parents brought these young people to the United States with a focus on providing their children with the hope, opportunity, and safety unavailable in their countries of birth.

Currently there is an estimated 800,000 young people that have received and benefitted from the DACA [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] program. Their stories are woven into our collective American identity as a nation of immigrants. They are veterans of our military, academic scholars in our universities, leaders in parishes and communities, and above all, our human brothers and sisters.

Through our Immigration Services program, we are helping undocumented young people apply for DACA renewal [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals].

Catholic Charities has not only seen the challenges faced by newcomers to our country first hand, we have also seen the incredible role immigrant families play in advancing the economic security along with the contributions they have made and continue to make in our country. At the heart of these efforts, Catholic Charities is encouraging integration and providing the necessary social support for newcomers to our country.

Throughout our long history, Catholic Charities has worked to protect and uphold the dignity of all people. Today, Catholic Charities continues to respond to the needs of immigrant communities coming to the United States from around the world.

To schedule an individualized consultation to answer questions and evaluate your eligibility for immigration benefits please email: ISAAC@catholic-charities.org.

DACA SUPREME COURT DECISION

On June 18, 2020 the Supreme Court (also known as SCOTUS) ruled in a 5 to 4 decision that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals [DACA] program will continue.

DACA is a United States immigration policy that allows some individuals with unlawful presence in the United States after being brought to the country as children to receive a renewable two-year period of deferred action from deportation and become eligible for a work permit in the U.S. in the U.S. To be eligible for the program, recipients cannot have felonies or serious misdemeanors on their records.

Catholic Charities highly encourages undocumented youth who meet the eligibility requirements and who will be applying for DACA for the first time to begin gathering their application documents so that they are prepared when USCIS [U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services] begins accepting applications. To schedule an individualized consultation to answer questions and evaluate your eligibility for immigration benefits please contact ISAAC@catholic-charities.org.

Catholic Charities believes the dignity of every human being particularly that of our children, must be protected. An estimated 800,000 young people have received and benefitted from the DACA program. Loving parents brought these young people to the United States with a focus on providing their children with the hope, opportunity, and safety unavailable in their countries of birth. Their stories are woven into our collective American identity as a nation of immigrants. They are veterans of our military, academic scholars in our universities, leaders in parishes and communities, and above all, our human brothers and sisters.

Throughout our long history, Catholic Charities has worked to protect and uphold the dignity of all people. Today, Catholic Charities continues to respond to the needs of immigrant communities coming to the United States from around the world. Through this work, Catholic Charities has not only seen the challenges faced by newcomers to our country, but we have also seen the incredible contributions immigrants have made and continue to make in our country. At the heart of these efforts, is the incredible role families play in advancing economic security, promoting integration, and providing the necessary social support for newcomers to our country.

DACA Update

USCIS [U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services] has yet to confirm that it is accepting and processing first-time DACA requests and advance parole applications in compliance with the Supreme Court's decision.

Requests that are filed prior to USCIS reopening its application process are at risk of being rejected and returned. Alternatively, they may be accepted and then denied resulting in losing the filing fee.

In addition, first-time filers who have never had contact with DHS [Department of Homeland Security] risk drawing attention by submitting a request to USCIS.

We will continue to monitor developments in DACA policy and litigation, and keep you updated.